Think left and think right and think low and think high. Oh the thinks you can think up if only you try!

Dr Seuss

Broadening the definition

There is a lot packed into being Thoughtful! Being thoughtful involves curiousity, intellectual alertness, and the ability to self-reflect. The ability to recognize patterns, make connections, infer, predict, formulate hypothesis, reason and use critical judgement are also aspects of being thoughtful. Thoughtfulness ties in wonderfully to Adrienne Gear’s Reading Power: connect, visualize, question, predict, infer, and transform. Thoughtfulness is exemplified by the child who asks insightful questions as a result of careful observation, reflection, and introspective thinking. A lack of thoughtfulness may be reflected by a child’s over-reliance on rote-learning, or seeming inability to go beyond provided information.

Stories that connect to Thoughtful

 

Sue’s Favourites

Flotsam

Fotsam

by David Wiesner

Knuffle Bunny

knuffle-bunny

by Mo William

One Plastic Bag

one-plastic-bag

by Miranda Paul

Chalk

chalk

by Bill Thompson

Other Great Stories

Questons Questions

questions-questions

by Marcus Pfister

Hey Little Ant

hey-little-ant

by Philip and Hanna  Hoose

Gently Step Out

step-gently-out

by Helen Frost

Nibbles a Green Tale

Nibbles: A Green Tale

by Charlotte Middleton

Ordinary Mary's Extraordinary Deed

Ordinary Mary's Extraordinary Deed

by Emily Pearson

Beautiful Opps

beautiful-opps

by Barney Saltzberg

Round Like A Ball

round-like-a-ball

by Lisa Campbell Ernst